Tag Archives: 海洋生物學

Hong Kong Underwater Photo & Video Competition Winners 2016 Announced

The Hong Kong Underwater Photo and Video Competition 2016, jointly organised by the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department (AFCD) and Hong Kong Underwater Association, announced its winning entries.

The Hong Kong Underwater Photo and Video Competition, in its 5th year now, received 443 entries this year, featuring marine ecology, habitats and marine life in Hong Kong waters.

An AFCD spokesman said, “Entries over the years have showcased the beauty of marine life and habitats in Hong Kong waters, and have helped promote the conservation of the marine environment.”

The event comprised a photo competition and a video competition. In the photo competition the categories were Macros/Close-ups and Standard/Wide Angle. In addition to prizes for champions and runners-up in each group, there were Special Prizes for Junior Underwater Photographers presented by the judging panel to encourage less experienced underwater photographers to participate in the competition.

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Macro/Close-up Category Winner: Vania KAM
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Macro/Close-up Category 1st runner-up: AU Wai Chi
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Macro/Close-up Category: 2nd runner-up: Thomas LAM
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Macro/Close-up Category Junior Underwater Photographer Winner: SO Chun Fung
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Macro/Close-up Category Merit Award: Thomas LAM
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Macro/Close-up Category Merit Award: Thomas LAM
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Macro/Close-up Category Merit Award: Tang Wai Chung
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Macro/Close-up Category Merit Award: Vania KAM
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Macro/Close-up Category Merity Award: Tang Wai Chung
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Macro/Close-up Category Merit Award: Vania KAM
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Macro/Close-up Category Merit Award: Wan Sheung Yue
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Macro/Close-up Category Merit Award: Lau Pong Wing Atim
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Macro/Close-up Category Merit Award: LEUNG Yu Yick

 

 

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Macro/Close-up Category Merit Award: Leung Wun Cheung
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Standard/Wide-Angle Category Winner: Yu Wing Chung
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Standard/Wide-Angle Category 1st runner-up: Wan Sheung Yue
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Standard/Wide-Angle Category 2nd runner-up: Thomas LAM
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Standard/Wide-Angle Category Junior Underwater Photographer Prize: SO Chun Fung
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Standard/Wide-Angle Category Merit Award: Thomas LAM
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Standard/Wide-Angle Category Merit Award: Ho Tsz Hung
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Standard/Wide-Angle Category Merit Award: Markus Klemmer
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Standard/Wide-Angle Category Merit Award: Vania KAM
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Standard/Wide-Angle Category Merit Award: Lau Man Chi Vanessa
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Standard/Wide-Angle Category Merit Award: Lo Wai Yip Derek
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Standard/Wide-Angle Category Merit Award: Poon Yiu Nam David
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Standard/Wide-Angle Category Merit Award: Yu Wing Chung
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Standard/Wide-Angle Category Merit Award: Poon Yiu Nam David
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Standard/Wide-Angle Category Merit Award: Lau Pong Wing Atim

I have added the winning video entries to this Youtube playlist. The winning photos as well as the video entries can also be found on the AFCD Chinese page for the competition and the competitions Facebook page.

Beautiful But Deadly – The Textile Coneshell

The venomous Conus textile is one of the most abundant and widespread cone shell in Hong Kong waters. Easily recognized by the tent-shaped markings on the orange-colored cone-shaped shell with wavy chocolates lines, you are advised to stay away from these beautiful but dangerous reef predators. They like to hide in sandy patches under rocks and  also occurs widely throughout the Info-Pacific and grow to a maximum of 15cm shell length. The danger they pose comes from a tiny venom-laden harpoon they can fire from their proboscis. They normally use this to hunt other sea snails by injection them with conotoxin through the harpoon-like needle teeth they can fire out of their proboscis. They can reach around to any point on their shell with this proboscis, and several human death have resulted from handling.


To see exactly how subtle and fast the venom injection is, I recommend this clip from YouTube of a textile cone in a tank hunting down a prey snail. The prey snail in the clip has actually sealed itself into its shell and shut the opening with a special door called an operculum – but apparently to no avail!

https://youtu.be/WCmvQdb51To

Four new Reef Fish Species for Hong Kong

A study by Allen W.L. Lo and Stanley K.H. Shea published recently in Msrine Biodiversity Records, has found 4 species of reef fish not previously known from Hong Kong waters. They also conclude that these 4 species are not introduced. So here is a welcome list of Hong Kong’s newest residents:

Ambyleleottis japonica

A Goby that grows to only 8.5 cm length and lives near the bottom and about which very little is known.

picture by J.E. Randall via Fishbase

 


Halichoeres hartzfeldii – the Goldstripe Wrasse

A reef living wrasse of the Western Pacific that grows up to 18cm in length.

picture by J.E. Randall via Fishbase



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anthigaster papua – the Papuan Toby

A pufferfish species from the West Pacific that grows to 10cm.

picture by J. Bednarzik via Fishbase

 


Parapriacanthus sp. – a species of Sweeper

The authors of the paper did not identify it to species so this is just a placeholder.

Parapriacanthus ransonnetti via WikiCommons

AFCD Seized 36 Live Sea Turtles from Lamma

The AFCD seized 36 live sea turtles from a fish raft at Sok Kwu Wan Fish Culture Zone on Friday (September 30).
Upon receipt of a report of sea turtles found on the fish raft from the Police, the AFCD officers were deployed to the scene for investigation and they seized 35 green sea turtles and a hawksbill turtle.
All the sea turtles were sent to Ocean Park Hong Kong for observation and detailed veterinary assessment and follow-up investigation by the AFCD is ongoing.

To report suspected irregularities, call the government hotline at 1823.

Turtles Returned to Sea

On Friday (12/8/16) the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department (AFCD) released three juvenile green turtles in the southeastern waters of Hong Kong.
The green turtles were found by members of the public at Pak Lap Beach and Silverstrand Beach in Sai Kung and a refuse collection depot on Tin Hau Temple Street in North Point between January 2014 and July this year.

After an initial check-up by the AFCD, the turtles were taken to Ocean Park Hong Kong (OPHK) for a thorough veterinary assessment and necessary medical treatment. Since then, they have been looked after at OPHK.

The three green turtles weighed 8.6 kg to 34.5 kg and measured about 45 cm to 66 cm in shell length. All of the turtles were in good condition and ready to be returned to sea.

Before the turtles were released into the sea, the AFCD tagged each of them with a microchip and Inconel tags for future identification. Satellite transmitters were also attached to their shells. By tracking the oceanic movement and feeding grounds of green turtles, the AFCD can collect data for formulating appropriate conservation measures and share its findings with other conservation authorities for the better conservation of sea turtles.

The green turtle is a globally endangered species. Members of the public are urged to report any sighting of sea turtles to the department via the government hotline 1823 to help protect them.

Another Dead Spadenose Shark Found

Another dead shark was found in Hong Kong waters over the weekend, just days after a dead dolphin and shark washed up on two separate Tuen Mun beaches.

It is believed that the two sharks are of the same, or related, shark species.

At 5:45pm on Saturday, a swimmer told lifeguards at Butterfly Beach about what he thought was a shark carcass floating near the shore.

Around six or seven lifeguards then went into the water, finding and retrieving a dead 36-centimetre-long spadenose shark.

Fourth Dead Cetacean Found in 1 Week

A dead finless porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides) was found in Discovery Bay on Sunday afternoon, the fourth dead marine mammal discovered in four days after the bodies of three dolphins were discovered on Thursday.
It was found in the water and handed over to the Ocean Park Conservation Foundation for an autopsy. The OPCFHK said that the porpoise was a 1.55 metre long female and the body had reached the fourth stage of decomposition. Its cause of death has yet to be determined.

On Thursday, the bodies of three Chinese white dolphins (Sousa chinensis) were found – one entangled in fishing wire near Lido Beach in Sham Tseng, one in waters near Lamma Island and another in Fan Kwai Tong off Lantau Island.

The Hong Kong Dolphin Conservation Society (HKDCS) estimate that there has been a decline since 2014, when 61 dolphins were estimated to be in Hong Kong waters.