Tag Archives: Shenzhen

Dead Huizhou Sperm Whale Was Pregnant Female

China Daily reported that an autopsy on the sperm whale that became stranded in Daya Bay, in South China’s Guangdong province, has revealed the whale was pregnant. A crane hoisted the dead sperm whale out of the Harbor last Wednesday. 
A developing 110 kg male fetus, about two meters in length, was recovered.

“It is the first time that an unborn baby has been found inside a stranded sperm whale in the world,” said Tong Shenhan, head of the land and marine life research institute of Xiamen city, who participated in the autopsy.

He believed that the finding would be of significance to the protection and rescue of sperm whale.

On Thursday, a group of about 20 experts from the School of Marine Sciences of Sun Yat-Sen University, Hong Kong Ocean Park and other institutes, conducted the autopsy in Huizhou Fishery Research and Extension Center, in Guangdong, taking samples of skin, fat, muscle and blood from the adult sperm whale.

They unexpectedly found milk in the whale’s breasts and then a placenta 2.6 meters in length.

The fetus will also undergo an autopsy, which is expected to take about one month due to its difficulty.

On Sunday morning, fishery authorities in Shenzhen city received a report of an adult whale trapped in fishing nets in waters off Daya Bay.

After the whale was freed from the nets, authorities and zoologists tried to guide it back into deep sea. However, it continued to swim in shallow waters off Shenzhen and Huizhou cities. It was confirmed to have been stranded near a wharf Tuesday afternoon and died Wednesday.

Tong said that the whale, estimated to be about 5 years old, was healthy and had no visible injuries.

He does not think it was tangled to death by fishing nets but the cause of death will be verified in at least a month.

The animal, weighing 14 tons and stretching 10 meters long, was lifted by a crane from the water in Huizhou port on Wednesday and was transported to Huizhou Fishery Research and Extension Center.

Huizhou has invited experts to conduct research on the whale examining its physiological structure, molecular biology, zoology and pathology, to provide more scientific data and theory for the protection of the endangered sperm whale.

The autopsy on the adult whale will continue over the next two days.

The city also plans to preserve four specimens of the animal’s skin, bone, viscera and placenta.

Sperm Whale Injured By Fishing Nets Trapped in Huizhou Harbor

A sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) received serious injuries to its tail while caught in a fishing net, which have left it only able to swim in circles, according to news portal chinanews.com (14/3/17).

The whale may have also damaged its sonar system, meaning it cannot find its way back to deeper waters.
The 12-meter-long mammal was found struggling in waters near Shenzhen on Sunday, suffering from several gashes with a tail fin that had been damaged by a fishing net.

Local divers and fishery officials worked together to release it from the net and guide it back to open waters.

However, the animal was too tired to make it away from the shore, and ended up in Huizhou Port on Monday, mere meters from the land. Huizhou is about 50 kilometers away from Shenzhen.

Local officials and 30 experts from the Hong Kong Ocean Park and the Institute of Deep-Sea Science and Engineering under the Chinese Academy of Sciences are monitoring the animal. 

One expert suggested luring or driving the whale back to the sea by using whale sounds or those of predators.

However, the expert warned that the whale may have to be poisoned or blown up if rescue efforts fail.

Wu Gang, deputy director of the Huizhou Marine and Fisheries Bureau, said they will first try to treat the whale’s injuries and that euthanasia will only be considered as a last resort.

Waterspout over Pearl River off Shenzhen Bao’an Airport

Apple Daily and the Standard reported a ‘tornado’ as Shenzhen was battered by thunderstorms and rain yesterday (11th May 2015). As the tornado was over the Pearl River Estuary and not actually on land it wasn’t a tornado, but a waterspout. 

The last report of a waterspout in the waters of Shenzhen Bay was in July 2010.

Dramatic Images of Shenzhen Red Tide

The Shanghaiist (Nov 26, 2014) reports that on Monday (24/11/2014), guests at the Dameisha Sheraton Resort in Shenzhen were witness to a red tide, as the sea water at the nearby beach turned a deep pink color, stretching for hundreds of meters. Dameisha is located in Mirs Bay just a few kilometres to the northeast of Hong Kong
According to the Shenzhen Marine Environment and Resources Monitoring Center, the red tide in this instance resulted from a non-toxic, algal bloom. However, despite center’s insistence that the bizarrely coloured water is harmless, a restriction on swimming and direct contact with the water has been advised.
This is not the first, and probably not the last, case of strangely colored water appearing in China.

IMG_8117.JPG

IMG_8118.JPG

The red tide cause was identified as the non-toxic plankton species Karenia brevis (according to this article). Aerial photographs printed by the daily mail show the extent of the bloom. Only two problems: 1) Karenia brevis is native to the Gulf of Mexico, 2) it is toxic. In fact HK AFCD does not even list this species in its red tide database, which would be odd since it has been monitoring red tides in Hong Kong waters for over 20 years…
So once again a tabloid (the UK’s Daily Mail) has not done its research properly.

IMG_8121.JPG

Where Does All the Beach Trash Come From?

While I have no doubt that much of the plastic trash on Hong Kong’s beaches and in the sea is generated locally especially during big beach events like Mid-Autumn Festival and Tuen Ng (Dragon Boat Festival) – I don’t remember it ever being as bad as it is nowadays. I grew up playing on Hong Kong beaches and actually had fun building huts out of some of the trash like driftwood, lost buoys and discarded wooden palettes. But as I remember it there was a lot of styrofoam trash (ice boxes and luch boxes and drink cups) and also plastic. But a lot of progress was made educating people not to discard their trash in country parks or in the sea with posters and TV ads. Then just as I thought it was getting better it startied getting worse. Yes, there has been an increase in Hong Kong’s population from 5.5 million when I was a child to 7 million now, but I don’t think thats to blame – the culture in Hong Kong has changed and people to guard and protect the environment much more now.

But mainlad China has changed enornously in the last 30 years starting with the economic reforms and special economic zone in Shenzhen in 1982 (or thereabouts). Now mainland China has all the same plastic packaged consumer goods and convenience foods and bottled drinks etc as Hong Kong. That has definitely changed. But the attitude to the environment is much slower to change. Big factories and local governments are being blamed for single-point pollution problems (quite rightly), but an awareness of the effects of individual actions and habits on the environment is not developed yet. So while HK has several marine-themed environmental programs and education campaigns (like Plastic Free Seas and The Hong Kong Shark Foundation etc) and volunteer-run beach clean-ups are quite common, I doubt that is the case in mainland China (if you know differently, please leave a comment).trashgate3

So the following articles from the Shanghaiist come as no surprise, but shed some light on where at least some of the trash on Hong Kong’s beaches comes from:

 beach_trash

That last one in particular explains a lot. Shenzhen Bay afterall is right next to Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta can flush trash straight into and past HK’s western edge (west Lantau) and out into the South China Sea. And the incoming tide can bring this trash as well as trash from other coastal soureces back in and onto our shores. More than that, the prevailing currents in Hong Kong change: from the northeast or the southwest depending on the season, so the notion of rubbish from Qingdao 1600 km away or Hainan 650 km away reaching Hong Kong is entirely reasonable and quite probable. trashgate2

We can not blame mainlanders for HK beach trash (even if mainlander bashing has apparently become a sport in HK), but it is clear that the ocean and the trash do not respect the HK-SAR border and to tackle the problem of beach trash on Hong Kong’s beaches and in the sea around us, we also need to work with the mainland and maybe use our experience in Hong Kong and our expertise to help them. Afterall HK has dealt with this problem for longer and “the pot should not call the kettle black”. And as the article “Foreign man is dubbed a ‘hero’ for picking up trash on Qingdao beach” shows, mainlanders are also fed up with the rubbish, but they seem to not realise that individual actions or inaction are part of the problem. So if you are expat in China, please be a “foreign hero” and teach by setting a good example (and don’t blame Chinese people for the trash – I have overheard that conversation several times and its pretty hypocritical – and racist). 

“If you would lift me up you must be on higher ground.” ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson